drquinzel:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Ksenia Tolmacheva's fairy tale photography
http://www.muza.pro
It’s no secret that Russia is home to some of the world’s most beautiful women, and photographer Ksenia Tolmacheva wanted to stand out among the many photographers in Moscow who take photos of models and brides at weddings, so this year she took on an ambitious photo project to portray a world of magic and fairy tales in order to promote her work. Her web site is: http://www.muza.pro

I WANNA DO A SHOOT LIKE THIS
Zoom Info
drquinzel:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Ksenia Tolmacheva's fairy tale photography
http://www.muza.pro
It’s no secret that Russia is home to some of the world’s most beautiful women, and photographer Ksenia Tolmacheva wanted to stand out among the many photographers in Moscow who take photos of models and brides at weddings, so this year she took on an ambitious photo project to portray a world of magic and fairy tales in order to promote her work. Her web site is: http://www.muza.pro

I WANNA DO A SHOOT LIKE THIS
Zoom Info
drquinzel:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Ksenia Tolmacheva's fairy tale photography
http://www.muza.pro
It’s no secret that Russia is home to some of the world’s most beautiful women, and photographer Ksenia Tolmacheva wanted to stand out among the many photographers in Moscow who take photos of models and brides at weddings, so this year she took on an ambitious photo project to portray a world of magic and fairy tales in order to promote her work. Her web site is: http://www.muza.pro

I WANNA DO A SHOOT LIKE THIS
Zoom Info
drquinzel:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Ksenia Tolmacheva's fairy tale photography
http://www.muza.pro
It’s no secret that Russia is home to some of the world’s most beautiful women, and photographer Ksenia Tolmacheva wanted to stand out among the many photographers in Moscow who take photos of models and brides at weddings, so this year she took on an ambitious photo project to portray a world of magic and fairy tales in order to promote her work. Her web site is: http://www.muza.pro

I WANNA DO A SHOOT LIKE THIS
Zoom Info
drquinzel:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Ksenia Tolmacheva's fairy tale photography
http://www.muza.pro
It’s no secret that Russia is home to some of the world’s most beautiful women, and photographer Ksenia Tolmacheva wanted to stand out among the many photographers in Moscow who take photos of models and brides at weddings, so this year she took on an ambitious photo project to portray a world of magic and fairy tales in order to promote her work. Her web site is: http://www.muza.pro

I WANNA DO A SHOOT LIKE THIS
Zoom Info
drquinzel:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Ksenia Tolmacheva's fairy tale photography
http://www.muza.pro
It’s no secret that Russia is home to some of the world’s most beautiful women, and photographer Ksenia Tolmacheva wanted to stand out among the many photographers in Moscow who take photos of models and brides at weddings, so this year she took on an ambitious photo project to portray a world of magic and fairy tales in order to promote her work. Her web site is: http://www.muza.pro

I WANNA DO A SHOOT LIKE THIS
Zoom Info
drquinzel:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Ksenia Tolmacheva's fairy tale photography
http://www.muza.pro
It’s no secret that Russia is home to some of the world’s most beautiful women, and photographer Ksenia Tolmacheva wanted to stand out among the many photographers in Moscow who take photos of models and brides at weddings, so this year she took on an ambitious photo project to portray a world of magic and fairy tales in order to promote her work. Her web site is: http://www.muza.pro

I WANNA DO A SHOOT LIKE THIS
Zoom Info
drquinzel:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Ksenia Tolmacheva's fairy tale photography
http://www.muza.pro
It’s no secret that Russia is home to some of the world’s most beautiful women, and photographer Ksenia Tolmacheva wanted to stand out among the many photographers in Moscow who take photos of models and brides at weddings, so this year she took on an ambitious photo project to portray a world of magic and fairy tales in order to promote her work. Her web site is: http://www.muza.pro

I WANNA DO A SHOOT LIKE THIS
Zoom Info
drquinzel:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Ksenia Tolmacheva's fairy tale photography
http://www.muza.pro
It’s no secret that Russia is home to some of the world’s most beautiful women, and photographer Ksenia Tolmacheva wanted to stand out among the many photographers in Moscow who take photos of models and brides at weddings, so this year she took on an ambitious photo project to portray a world of magic and fairy tales in order to promote her work. Her web site is: http://www.muza.pro

I WANNA DO A SHOOT LIKE THIS
Zoom Info
drquinzel:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Ksenia Tolmacheva's fairy tale photography
http://www.muza.pro
It’s no secret that Russia is home to some of the world’s most beautiful women, and photographer Ksenia Tolmacheva wanted to stand out among the many photographers in Moscow who take photos of models and brides at weddings, so this year she took on an ambitious photo project to portray a world of magic and fairy tales in order to promote her work. Her web site is: http://www.muza.pro

I WANNA DO A SHOOT LIKE THIS
Zoom Info

drquinzel:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Ksenia Tolmacheva's fairy tale photography

It’s no secret that Russia is home to some of the world’s most beautiful women, and photographer Ksenia Tolmacheva wanted to stand out among the many photographers in Moscow who take photos of models and brides at weddings, so this year she took on an ambitious photo project to portray a world of magic and fairy tales in order to promote her work. Her web site is: http://www.muza.pro

I WANNA DO A SHOOT LIKE THIS

likeafieldmouse:

Joshua Dudley Greer - Point Pleasant (2009-12)
Artist’s statement:
"The West Virginia Ordnance Works (WVOW) was an explosives manufacturing facility constructed during World War II just outside Point Pleasant, West Virginia.
Occupying 8,000 acres along the eastern bank of the Ohio River, the WVOW was built specifically for the production and storage of trinitrotoluene (TNT).
At its peak, nearly 500,000 pounds of TNT were produced here each day and stored in a massive array of concrete igloos. The site was officially declared surplus and closed in 1945, after which time much of the land was deeded to the state of West Virginia for the creation of the McClintic State Wildlife Management Area.
A large system of ponds and wetlands was constructed as a habitat for waterfowl, migratory birds and other wildlife species. This area came to be known simply as T.N.T. and developed into a popular hangout for local youth, hunters and fishermen.
In the early 1980’s, EPA and state investigations revealed that the groundwater, soil and surface water of T.N.T. were heavily contaminated with explosive nitroaromatic compounds including TNT, trinitrobenzene, and dinitrotoluene, as well as arsenic, lead, beryllium and asbestos.
The site was placed on the EPA’s National Priority List in 1983 and extensive cleanup efforts began in 1991. While a large portion of the original facility has been remediated, many of the toxic and explosive contaminants were simply buried on site. The remnants of the WVOW facility survive as relics to our nation’s violent history, while the re-purposed landscape hides much of its true nature just beneath the surface.
The site that remains outside Point Pleasant is a haunting place of beauty, mystery and violence.
Using an 8x10 view camera, I am photographing the ruins of a once monumental military-industrial complex as it tangles with the surrounding landscape of forest, fields and swamp. While certain structures offer a glimpse of what has transpired on this site, many of my photographs refer indirectly to violence and environmental neglect through metaphor. The repetition of specific imagery is intended to create a labyrinth of sorts where certain motifs are experienced over and over. The interplay of visibility and invisibility that runs throughout these images alludes to the way in which we commonly misperceive both contamination and beauty through strictly visual means.”
1. Path S7 (Entrance)
2. TNT Storage Igloo N1-B
3. TNT Storage Igloos in Pond
4. Dead Deer
5.Buried Asbestos and Explosives Contamination
6. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S4-A
7. Nests
8. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A
9. Mandible
10. Bullets
Zoom Info
likeafieldmouse:

Joshua Dudley Greer - Point Pleasant (2009-12)
Artist’s statement:
"The West Virginia Ordnance Works (WVOW) was an explosives manufacturing facility constructed during World War II just outside Point Pleasant, West Virginia.
Occupying 8,000 acres along the eastern bank of the Ohio River, the WVOW was built specifically for the production and storage of trinitrotoluene (TNT).
At its peak, nearly 500,000 pounds of TNT were produced here each day and stored in a massive array of concrete igloos. The site was officially declared surplus and closed in 1945, after which time much of the land was deeded to the state of West Virginia for the creation of the McClintic State Wildlife Management Area.
A large system of ponds and wetlands was constructed as a habitat for waterfowl, migratory birds and other wildlife species. This area came to be known simply as T.N.T. and developed into a popular hangout for local youth, hunters and fishermen.
In the early 1980’s, EPA and state investigations revealed that the groundwater, soil and surface water of T.N.T. were heavily contaminated with explosive nitroaromatic compounds including TNT, trinitrobenzene, and dinitrotoluene, as well as arsenic, lead, beryllium and asbestos.
The site was placed on the EPA’s National Priority List in 1983 and extensive cleanup efforts began in 1991. While a large portion of the original facility has been remediated, many of the toxic and explosive contaminants were simply buried on site. The remnants of the WVOW facility survive as relics to our nation’s violent history, while the re-purposed landscape hides much of its true nature just beneath the surface.
The site that remains outside Point Pleasant is a haunting place of beauty, mystery and violence.
Using an 8x10 view camera, I am photographing the ruins of a once monumental military-industrial complex as it tangles with the surrounding landscape of forest, fields and swamp. While certain structures offer a glimpse of what has transpired on this site, many of my photographs refer indirectly to violence and environmental neglect through metaphor. The repetition of specific imagery is intended to create a labyrinth of sorts where certain motifs are experienced over and over. The interplay of visibility and invisibility that runs throughout these images alludes to the way in which we commonly misperceive both contamination and beauty through strictly visual means.”
1. Path S7 (Entrance)
2. TNT Storage Igloo N1-B
3. TNT Storage Igloos in Pond
4. Dead Deer
5.Buried Asbestos and Explosives Contamination
6. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S4-A
7. Nests
8. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A
9. Mandible
10. Bullets
Zoom Info
likeafieldmouse:

Joshua Dudley Greer - Point Pleasant (2009-12)
Artist’s statement:
"The West Virginia Ordnance Works (WVOW) was an explosives manufacturing facility constructed during World War II just outside Point Pleasant, West Virginia.
Occupying 8,000 acres along the eastern bank of the Ohio River, the WVOW was built specifically for the production and storage of trinitrotoluene (TNT).
At its peak, nearly 500,000 pounds of TNT were produced here each day and stored in a massive array of concrete igloos. The site was officially declared surplus and closed in 1945, after which time much of the land was deeded to the state of West Virginia for the creation of the McClintic State Wildlife Management Area.
A large system of ponds and wetlands was constructed as a habitat for waterfowl, migratory birds and other wildlife species. This area came to be known simply as T.N.T. and developed into a popular hangout for local youth, hunters and fishermen.
In the early 1980’s, EPA and state investigations revealed that the groundwater, soil and surface water of T.N.T. were heavily contaminated with explosive nitroaromatic compounds including TNT, trinitrobenzene, and dinitrotoluene, as well as arsenic, lead, beryllium and asbestos.
The site was placed on the EPA’s National Priority List in 1983 and extensive cleanup efforts began in 1991. While a large portion of the original facility has been remediated, many of the toxic and explosive contaminants were simply buried on site. The remnants of the WVOW facility survive as relics to our nation’s violent history, while the re-purposed landscape hides much of its true nature just beneath the surface.
The site that remains outside Point Pleasant is a haunting place of beauty, mystery and violence.
Using an 8x10 view camera, I am photographing the ruins of a once monumental military-industrial complex as it tangles with the surrounding landscape of forest, fields and swamp. While certain structures offer a glimpse of what has transpired on this site, many of my photographs refer indirectly to violence and environmental neglect through metaphor. The repetition of specific imagery is intended to create a labyrinth of sorts where certain motifs are experienced over and over. The interplay of visibility and invisibility that runs throughout these images alludes to the way in which we commonly misperceive both contamination and beauty through strictly visual means.”
1. Path S7 (Entrance)
2. TNT Storage Igloo N1-B
3. TNT Storage Igloos in Pond
4. Dead Deer
5.Buried Asbestos and Explosives Contamination
6. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S4-A
7. Nests
8. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A
9. Mandible
10. Bullets
Zoom Info
likeafieldmouse:

Joshua Dudley Greer - Point Pleasant (2009-12)
Artist’s statement:
"The West Virginia Ordnance Works (WVOW) was an explosives manufacturing facility constructed during World War II just outside Point Pleasant, West Virginia.
Occupying 8,000 acres along the eastern bank of the Ohio River, the WVOW was built specifically for the production and storage of trinitrotoluene (TNT).
At its peak, nearly 500,000 pounds of TNT were produced here each day and stored in a massive array of concrete igloos. The site was officially declared surplus and closed in 1945, after which time much of the land was deeded to the state of West Virginia for the creation of the McClintic State Wildlife Management Area.
A large system of ponds and wetlands was constructed as a habitat for waterfowl, migratory birds and other wildlife species. This area came to be known simply as T.N.T. and developed into a popular hangout for local youth, hunters and fishermen.
In the early 1980’s, EPA and state investigations revealed that the groundwater, soil and surface water of T.N.T. were heavily contaminated with explosive nitroaromatic compounds including TNT, trinitrobenzene, and dinitrotoluene, as well as arsenic, lead, beryllium and asbestos.
The site was placed on the EPA’s National Priority List in 1983 and extensive cleanup efforts began in 1991. While a large portion of the original facility has been remediated, many of the toxic and explosive contaminants were simply buried on site. The remnants of the WVOW facility survive as relics to our nation’s violent history, while the re-purposed landscape hides much of its true nature just beneath the surface.
The site that remains outside Point Pleasant is a haunting place of beauty, mystery and violence.
Using an 8x10 view camera, I am photographing the ruins of a once monumental military-industrial complex as it tangles with the surrounding landscape of forest, fields and swamp. While certain structures offer a glimpse of what has transpired on this site, many of my photographs refer indirectly to violence and environmental neglect through metaphor. The repetition of specific imagery is intended to create a labyrinth of sorts where certain motifs are experienced over and over. The interplay of visibility and invisibility that runs throughout these images alludes to the way in which we commonly misperceive both contamination and beauty through strictly visual means.”
1. Path S7 (Entrance)
2. TNT Storage Igloo N1-B
3. TNT Storage Igloos in Pond
4. Dead Deer
5.Buried Asbestos and Explosives Contamination
6. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S4-A
7. Nests
8. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A
9. Mandible
10. Bullets
Zoom Info
likeafieldmouse:

Joshua Dudley Greer - Point Pleasant (2009-12)
Artist’s statement:
"The West Virginia Ordnance Works (WVOW) was an explosives manufacturing facility constructed during World War II just outside Point Pleasant, West Virginia.
Occupying 8,000 acres along the eastern bank of the Ohio River, the WVOW was built specifically for the production and storage of trinitrotoluene (TNT).
At its peak, nearly 500,000 pounds of TNT were produced here each day and stored in a massive array of concrete igloos. The site was officially declared surplus and closed in 1945, after which time much of the land was deeded to the state of West Virginia for the creation of the McClintic State Wildlife Management Area.
A large system of ponds and wetlands was constructed as a habitat for waterfowl, migratory birds and other wildlife species. This area came to be known simply as T.N.T. and developed into a popular hangout for local youth, hunters and fishermen.
In the early 1980’s, EPA and state investigations revealed that the groundwater, soil and surface water of T.N.T. were heavily contaminated with explosive nitroaromatic compounds including TNT, trinitrobenzene, and dinitrotoluene, as well as arsenic, lead, beryllium and asbestos.
The site was placed on the EPA’s National Priority List in 1983 and extensive cleanup efforts began in 1991. While a large portion of the original facility has been remediated, many of the toxic and explosive contaminants were simply buried on site. The remnants of the WVOW facility survive as relics to our nation’s violent history, while the re-purposed landscape hides much of its true nature just beneath the surface.
The site that remains outside Point Pleasant is a haunting place of beauty, mystery and violence.
Using an 8x10 view camera, I am photographing the ruins of a once monumental military-industrial complex as it tangles with the surrounding landscape of forest, fields and swamp. While certain structures offer a glimpse of what has transpired on this site, many of my photographs refer indirectly to violence and environmental neglect through metaphor. The repetition of specific imagery is intended to create a labyrinth of sorts where certain motifs are experienced over and over. The interplay of visibility and invisibility that runs throughout these images alludes to the way in which we commonly misperceive both contamination and beauty through strictly visual means.”
1. Path S7 (Entrance)
2. TNT Storage Igloo N1-B
3. TNT Storage Igloos in Pond
4. Dead Deer
5.Buried Asbestos and Explosives Contamination
6. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S4-A
7. Nests
8. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A
9. Mandible
10. Bullets
Zoom Info
likeafieldmouse:

Joshua Dudley Greer - Point Pleasant (2009-12)
Artist’s statement:
"The West Virginia Ordnance Works (WVOW) was an explosives manufacturing facility constructed during World War II just outside Point Pleasant, West Virginia.
Occupying 8,000 acres along the eastern bank of the Ohio River, the WVOW was built specifically for the production and storage of trinitrotoluene (TNT).
At its peak, nearly 500,000 pounds of TNT were produced here each day and stored in a massive array of concrete igloos. The site was officially declared surplus and closed in 1945, after which time much of the land was deeded to the state of West Virginia for the creation of the McClintic State Wildlife Management Area.
A large system of ponds and wetlands was constructed as a habitat for waterfowl, migratory birds and other wildlife species. This area came to be known simply as T.N.T. and developed into a popular hangout for local youth, hunters and fishermen.
In the early 1980’s, EPA and state investigations revealed that the groundwater, soil and surface water of T.N.T. were heavily contaminated with explosive nitroaromatic compounds including TNT, trinitrobenzene, and dinitrotoluene, as well as arsenic, lead, beryllium and asbestos.
The site was placed on the EPA’s National Priority List in 1983 and extensive cleanup efforts began in 1991. While a large portion of the original facility has been remediated, many of the toxic and explosive contaminants were simply buried on site. The remnants of the WVOW facility survive as relics to our nation’s violent history, while the re-purposed landscape hides much of its true nature just beneath the surface.
The site that remains outside Point Pleasant is a haunting place of beauty, mystery and violence.
Using an 8x10 view camera, I am photographing the ruins of a once monumental military-industrial complex as it tangles with the surrounding landscape of forest, fields and swamp. While certain structures offer a glimpse of what has transpired on this site, many of my photographs refer indirectly to violence and environmental neglect through metaphor. The repetition of specific imagery is intended to create a labyrinth of sorts where certain motifs are experienced over and over. The interplay of visibility and invisibility that runs throughout these images alludes to the way in which we commonly misperceive both contamination and beauty through strictly visual means.”
1. Path S7 (Entrance)
2. TNT Storage Igloo N1-B
3. TNT Storage Igloos in Pond
4. Dead Deer
5.Buried Asbestos and Explosives Contamination
6. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S4-A
7. Nests
8. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A
9. Mandible
10. Bullets
Zoom Info
likeafieldmouse:

Joshua Dudley Greer - Point Pleasant (2009-12)
Artist’s statement:
"The West Virginia Ordnance Works (WVOW) was an explosives manufacturing facility constructed during World War II just outside Point Pleasant, West Virginia.
Occupying 8,000 acres along the eastern bank of the Ohio River, the WVOW was built specifically for the production and storage of trinitrotoluene (TNT).
At its peak, nearly 500,000 pounds of TNT were produced here each day and stored in a massive array of concrete igloos. The site was officially declared surplus and closed in 1945, after which time much of the land was deeded to the state of West Virginia for the creation of the McClintic State Wildlife Management Area.
A large system of ponds and wetlands was constructed as a habitat for waterfowl, migratory birds and other wildlife species. This area came to be known simply as T.N.T. and developed into a popular hangout for local youth, hunters and fishermen.
In the early 1980’s, EPA and state investigations revealed that the groundwater, soil and surface water of T.N.T. were heavily contaminated with explosive nitroaromatic compounds including TNT, trinitrobenzene, and dinitrotoluene, as well as arsenic, lead, beryllium and asbestos.
The site was placed on the EPA’s National Priority List in 1983 and extensive cleanup efforts began in 1991. While a large portion of the original facility has been remediated, many of the toxic and explosive contaminants were simply buried on site. The remnants of the WVOW facility survive as relics to our nation’s violent history, while the re-purposed landscape hides much of its true nature just beneath the surface.
The site that remains outside Point Pleasant is a haunting place of beauty, mystery and violence.
Using an 8x10 view camera, I am photographing the ruins of a once monumental military-industrial complex as it tangles with the surrounding landscape of forest, fields and swamp. While certain structures offer a glimpse of what has transpired on this site, many of my photographs refer indirectly to violence and environmental neglect through metaphor. The repetition of specific imagery is intended to create a labyrinth of sorts where certain motifs are experienced over and over. The interplay of visibility and invisibility that runs throughout these images alludes to the way in which we commonly misperceive both contamination and beauty through strictly visual means.”
1. Path S7 (Entrance)
2. TNT Storage Igloo N1-B
3. TNT Storage Igloos in Pond
4. Dead Deer
5.Buried Asbestos and Explosives Contamination
6. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S4-A
7. Nests
8. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A
9. Mandible
10. Bullets
Zoom Info
likeafieldmouse:

Joshua Dudley Greer - Point Pleasant (2009-12)
Artist’s statement:
"The West Virginia Ordnance Works (WVOW) was an explosives manufacturing facility constructed during World War II just outside Point Pleasant, West Virginia.
Occupying 8,000 acres along the eastern bank of the Ohio River, the WVOW was built specifically for the production and storage of trinitrotoluene (TNT).
At its peak, nearly 500,000 pounds of TNT were produced here each day and stored in a massive array of concrete igloos. The site was officially declared surplus and closed in 1945, after which time much of the land was deeded to the state of West Virginia for the creation of the McClintic State Wildlife Management Area.
A large system of ponds and wetlands was constructed as a habitat for waterfowl, migratory birds and other wildlife species. This area came to be known simply as T.N.T. and developed into a popular hangout for local youth, hunters and fishermen.
In the early 1980’s, EPA and state investigations revealed that the groundwater, soil and surface water of T.N.T. were heavily contaminated with explosive nitroaromatic compounds including TNT, trinitrobenzene, and dinitrotoluene, as well as arsenic, lead, beryllium and asbestos.
The site was placed on the EPA’s National Priority List in 1983 and extensive cleanup efforts began in 1991. While a large portion of the original facility has been remediated, many of the toxic and explosive contaminants were simply buried on site. The remnants of the WVOW facility survive as relics to our nation’s violent history, while the re-purposed landscape hides much of its true nature just beneath the surface.
The site that remains outside Point Pleasant is a haunting place of beauty, mystery and violence.
Using an 8x10 view camera, I am photographing the ruins of a once monumental military-industrial complex as it tangles with the surrounding landscape of forest, fields and swamp. While certain structures offer a glimpse of what has transpired on this site, many of my photographs refer indirectly to violence and environmental neglect through metaphor. The repetition of specific imagery is intended to create a labyrinth of sorts where certain motifs are experienced over and over. The interplay of visibility and invisibility that runs throughout these images alludes to the way in which we commonly misperceive both contamination and beauty through strictly visual means.”
1. Path S7 (Entrance)
2. TNT Storage Igloo N1-B
3. TNT Storage Igloos in Pond
4. Dead Deer
5.Buried Asbestos and Explosives Contamination
6. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S4-A
7. Nests
8. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A
9. Mandible
10. Bullets
Zoom Info
likeafieldmouse:

Joshua Dudley Greer - Point Pleasant (2009-12)
Artist’s statement:
"The West Virginia Ordnance Works (WVOW) was an explosives manufacturing facility constructed during World War II just outside Point Pleasant, West Virginia.
Occupying 8,000 acres along the eastern bank of the Ohio River, the WVOW was built specifically for the production and storage of trinitrotoluene (TNT).
At its peak, nearly 500,000 pounds of TNT were produced here each day and stored in a massive array of concrete igloos. The site was officially declared surplus and closed in 1945, after which time much of the land was deeded to the state of West Virginia for the creation of the McClintic State Wildlife Management Area.
A large system of ponds and wetlands was constructed as a habitat for waterfowl, migratory birds and other wildlife species. This area came to be known simply as T.N.T. and developed into a popular hangout for local youth, hunters and fishermen.
In the early 1980’s, EPA and state investigations revealed that the groundwater, soil and surface water of T.N.T. were heavily contaminated with explosive nitroaromatic compounds including TNT, trinitrobenzene, and dinitrotoluene, as well as arsenic, lead, beryllium and asbestos.
The site was placed on the EPA’s National Priority List in 1983 and extensive cleanup efforts began in 1991. While a large portion of the original facility has been remediated, many of the toxic and explosive contaminants were simply buried on site. The remnants of the WVOW facility survive as relics to our nation’s violent history, while the re-purposed landscape hides much of its true nature just beneath the surface.
The site that remains outside Point Pleasant is a haunting place of beauty, mystery and violence.
Using an 8x10 view camera, I am photographing the ruins of a once monumental military-industrial complex as it tangles with the surrounding landscape of forest, fields and swamp. While certain structures offer a glimpse of what has transpired on this site, many of my photographs refer indirectly to violence and environmental neglect through metaphor. The repetition of specific imagery is intended to create a labyrinth of sorts where certain motifs are experienced over and over. The interplay of visibility and invisibility that runs throughout these images alludes to the way in which we commonly misperceive both contamination and beauty through strictly visual means.”
1. Path S7 (Entrance)
2. TNT Storage Igloo N1-B
3. TNT Storage Igloos in Pond
4. Dead Deer
5.Buried Asbestos and Explosives Contamination
6. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S4-A
7. Nests
8. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A
9. Mandible
10. Bullets
Zoom Info
likeafieldmouse:

Joshua Dudley Greer - Point Pleasant (2009-12)
Artist’s statement:
"The West Virginia Ordnance Works (WVOW) was an explosives manufacturing facility constructed during World War II just outside Point Pleasant, West Virginia.
Occupying 8,000 acres along the eastern bank of the Ohio River, the WVOW was built specifically for the production and storage of trinitrotoluene (TNT).
At its peak, nearly 500,000 pounds of TNT were produced here each day and stored in a massive array of concrete igloos. The site was officially declared surplus and closed in 1945, after which time much of the land was deeded to the state of West Virginia for the creation of the McClintic State Wildlife Management Area.
A large system of ponds and wetlands was constructed as a habitat for waterfowl, migratory birds and other wildlife species. This area came to be known simply as T.N.T. and developed into a popular hangout for local youth, hunters and fishermen.
In the early 1980’s, EPA and state investigations revealed that the groundwater, soil and surface water of T.N.T. were heavily contaminated with explosive nitroaromatic compounds including TNT, trinitrobenzene, and dinitrotoluene, as well as arsenic, lead, beryllium and asbestos.
The site was placed on the EPA’s National Priority List in 1983 and extensive cleanup efforts began in 1991. While a large portion of the original facility has been remediated, many of the toxic and explosive contaminants were simply buried on site. The remnants of the WVOW facility survive as relics to our nation’s violent history, while the re-purposed landscape hides much of its true nature just beneath the surface.
The site that remains outside Point Pleasant is a haunting place of beauty, mystery and violence.
Using an 8x10 view camera, I am photographing the ruins of a once monumental military-industrial complex as it tangles with the surrounding landscape of forest, fields and swamp. While certain structures offer a glimpse of what has transpired on this site, many of my photographs refer indirectly to violence and environmental neglect through metaphor. The repetition of specific imagery is intended to create a labyrinth of sorts where certain motifs are experienced over and over. The interplay of visibility and invisibility that runs throughout these images alludes to the way in which we commonly misperceive both contamination and beauty through strictly visual means.”
1. Path S7 (Entrance)
2. TNT Storage Igloo N1-B
3. TNT Storage Igloos in Pond
4. Dead Deer
5.Buried Asbestos and Explosives Contamination
6. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S4-A
7. Nests
8. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A
9. Mandible
10. Bullets
Zoom Info

likeafieldmouse:

Joshua Dudley Greer - Point Pleasant (2009-12)

Artist’s statement:

"The West Virginia Ordnance Works (WVOW) was an explosives manufacturing facility constructed during World War II just outside Point Pleasant, West Virginia.

Occupying 8,000 acres along the eastern bank of the Ohio River, the WVOW was built specifically for the production and storage of trinitrotoluene (TNT).

At its peak, nearly 500,000 pounds of TNT were produced here each day and stored in a massive array of concrete igloos. The site was officially declared surplus and closed in 1945, after which time much of the land was deeded to the state of West Virginia for the creation of the McClintic State Wildlife Management Area.

A large system of ponds and wetlands was constructed as a habitat for waterfowl, migratory birds and other wildlife species. This area came to be known simply as T.N.T. and developed into a popular hangout for local youth, hunters and fishermen.

In the early 1980’s, EPA and state investigations revealed that the groundwater, soil and surface water of T.N.T. were heavily contaminated with explosive nitroaromatic compounds including TNT, trinitrobenzene, and dinitrotoluene, as well as arsenic, lead, beryllium and asbestos.

The site was placed on the EPA’s National Priority List in 1983 and extensive cleanup efforts began in 1991. While a large portion of the original facility has been remediated, many of the toxic and explosive contaminants were simply buried on site. The remnants of the WVOW facility survive as relics to our nation’s violent history, while the re-purposed landscape hides much of its true nature just beneath the surface.

The site that remains outside Point Pleasant is a haunting place of beauty, mystery and violence.

Using an 8x10 view camera, I am photographing the ruins of a once monumental military-industrial complex as it tangles with the surrounding landscape of forest, fields and swamp. While certain structures offer a glimpse of what has transpired on this site, many of my photographs refer indirectly to violence and environmental neglect through metaphor. The repetition of specific imagery is intended to create a labyrinth of sorts where certain motifs are experienced over and over. The interplay of visibility and invisibility that runs throughout these images alludes to the way in which we commonly misperceive both contamination and beauty through strictly visual means.”

1. Path S7 (Entrance)

2. TNT Storage Igloo N1-B

3. TNT Storage Igloos in Pond

4. Dead Deer

5.Buried Asbestos and Explosives Contamination

6. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S4-A

7. Nests

8. Interior, TNT Storage Igloo S1-A

9. Mandible

10. Bullets

The truth is that the more intimately you know someone, the more clearly you’ll see their flaws. That’s just the way it is. This is why marriages fail, why children are abandoned, why friendships don’t last. You might think you love someone until you see the way they act when they’re out of money or under pressure or hungry, for goodness’ sake. Love is something different. Love is choosing to serve someone and be with someone in spite of their filthy heart. Love is patient and kind, love is deliberate. Love is hard. Love is pain and sacrifice, it’s seeing the darkness in another person and defying the impulse to jump ship.

everybody has pretty much forgotten what love even is (via fr0zentatertots)